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Check out all of the posts in the category ‘Behind the Collection’ below. If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, try searching by using the box on the right hand side of this page.

Snapshots from Southsea

Established in the summer of 1982, Southsea Deckchairs are the small UK company responsible for the majority of deckchairs you see in our Royal Parks and dotted along the British coastlines. We paid a visit to Southsea Beach to explore the setting that inspired this enduring British deckchair company.

Southsea Deckchairs 1

Southsea Deckchairs 2

Southsea Deckchairs 8

Southsea Deckchairs 7

Southsea Deckchairs 3

Southsea Deckchairs 6

Southsea Deckchairs 5

Classic striped deckchairs were originally designed so that each colour represented a different seaside resort, making it more difficult for them to be removed from their righful spot. Alongside our clothing collaboration, Southsea Deckchairs have created a limited edition run of deckchairs sporting red and navy stripes, based on the Fred Perry tipping dimensions. See our men's and women's collaboration collections with Southsea Deckchairs online and in our Authentic shops now.

www.deckchairs.co.uk

Jamie Reid Laurel Wreath Blank Canvas

We are proud to introduce anarchic and influential artist, Jamie Reid, to the 2014 Laurel Wreath Blank Canvas project.

Accredited with defining the look of the late 70s punk rock scene, Jamie’s work includes one of the most famous album covers of all time, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols. Some 40 years on his work continues to inspire individuality and free-thinking.

The Blank Canvas project itself acts as a platform for thoughts, ideas and concepts that connect with the Laurel Wreath and what it stands to represent. Each season artists, brands or collectives are invited to customise individual pieces, in turn bringing a fresh interpretation of both their work and the garment. Jamie Reid's three designs speak of both his wit and sense of rebellion.

Belfast born, London raised, Jamie Reid was brought up in a politically active environment. During the 60s, he attended Art College with future Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren. A committed anarchist from a young age, he left the capital in the early 70s, for France, and co-founded anarchistic publishing house Suburban Press. It was during this time he developed his trademark ransom note style graphics, that went onto define the look of punk.

Jamie Reid Pre Sex Pistols 'Woman No Feelings'

His return to London in the mid-70s led him to the newly formed Sex Pistols. He designed the cover for the group’s debut (and only) studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols and also co-wrote the lyrics of one of the groups most popular songs Anarchy in the UK.

The artist has continued to dedicate his work to thought provoking political ideas and messages. His touring exhibition ‘Peace is Tough’ reached cities from New York to Tokyo. The tour presented an archive of imagery spanning the decades, elements of which are present in extremely important international collections, including that of the Tate, acknowledging Reid’s importance in the narrative of 20th and 21st century culture.

Jamie Reid Stop Demonising Our Yobs

In his three symbolic Blank Canvas shirt designs Jamie is inspired by three defined periods of work.

A SHORT SHARP SHOCK

A Short Sharp Shock Twin Tipped Shirt Designed by Jamie Reid

Using the classic Black/Champagne twin tipped shirt as a base, the artist has applied a screen-print of his trademark ransom cut-out letters to carry the message A Short Sharp Shock.  The phrase was originally used in Gilbert and Sullivan’s 1885 comic opera, The Mikado, which later became popular in music and symbolises Reid’s connection to the punk movement. The shirt is finished with a bronze embroidered Laurel Wreath and a white screen printed Jamie Reid signature on the hem including his signature OVA symbol.

A Short Sharp Shock - Front - Designed by Jamie Reid

PEACE IS TOUGH

Peace Is Tough Shirt Designed by Jamie Reid

Using the Fred Perry shirt in its purest form as a base, Jamie has applied multi-coloured screen prints and embroidery to illustrate Boudicca shaking her spear at the Houses of Parliament. The imagery, inspired by his time at anarchistic publishing house Suburban Press, symbolises the artists uprising to order and the establishment. The back of the shirt is fully screen printed in red with Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People in revolt, framed by the towers of Croydon. An embroidered OVO logo couples with a Peace Is Tough print to complete the message. Finished with a black Laurel Wreath embroidery.

Peace Is Tough Shirt - Back - Designed by Jamie Reid

TIME FOR MAGIC SHIRT

Time For Magic Shirt - Back - Designed by Jamie Reid

In his third and final design, Jamie uses the solid black shirt to showcase some of his more recent work. The screen-printed Hare, a symbol of free-thinking, is a direct signal to Joseph Beuys, whose work ‘Free International University’ acted as a blueprint for numerous counter-cultural initiatives of the late 1960s. A combination of print and embroidery is used to create a collage of OVAs to the front.  Finished with bronze Laurel Wreath embroidery.

 

Time For Magic Shirt - Designed by Jamie Reid

All three designs have been produced in limited numbers for both men and women and come delivered in a special edition Jamie Reid printed envelope. You can view more detailed product images and shop the collection on our website.

A 60 Second Guide To: Cycling Jerseys

Originally designed as a piece of performance wear, the humble cycling jersey has grown to represent over a century of stories and tales. 

The designs symbolise a moment in time - a particular team, a significant race, an epic battle, a sporting hero. Some jerseys become iconic and sought after pieces of memorabilia, earning themselves a place in the 'hall of design classics'.

Jersey design has continuously developed over the years, team sponsorship alongside technological advances in materials have both played a part in the evolution - however some features remain unchanged.

Contrast Panel Cycling Shirt - Bradley Wiggins AW13 Collection

Typically the back hem is scooped, to help keep the rider's back covered whilst bent over in racing position. The back of the shirt also features a combination of fastened and open pockets - it would be no good having them on the front of the body as the contents would fall out mid-ride. A long zip fastening to the front can be opened to allow for ventilation.  

The cuts are traditionally slim and long, helping to reduce air resistance and allowing the fabric to 'perform'; wicking the moisture it needs to sit close to the skin. Sponsors will use a combination of print, embroidery or applique to showcase their names - colours, panels and tipping combinations become synonymous with specific teams.

Contrast Sleeve Cycling Shirt - Bradley Wiggins AW13 Collection 
During the late 1950s, jerseys worn by road riding style icons such as Tom Simpson and Jacques Anquetil made their way from performance wear to streetwear. Slim fitting and full of continental allure, the designs held huge appeal for the jazz loving modernists of that time. The fact that many of the shirts were crafted in merino wool was an added bonus – the breathable fabric was perfect for keeping fresh after a spot of all night dancing. Designs from this period have long continued to be a mainstay of the mod casual wardrobe.

This season's Bradley Wiggins Collection characteristically references jerseys from the Golden Age of cycling. Elements of vintage shirts are explored and blended with signature Fred Perry details, twin tipping colours lifted into colour block panels, a champion inspired stripe knitted into cuffs. Bradley has been involved in each and every stage of the design process, bringing his own ideas, inspirations and style and in turn, each shirt in the collection comes to to tell a story. 

See this season's Bradley Wiggins Collection online and in shops now.