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Check out all of the posts in the category ‘Behind the Collection’ below. If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, try searching by using the box on the right hand side of this page.

A 60 Second Guide To: Cycling Jerseys

Originally designed as a piece of performance wear, the humble cycling jersey has grown to represent over a century of stories and tales. 

The designs symbolise a moment in time - a particular team, a significant race, an epic battle, a sporting hero. Some jerseys become iconic and sought after pieces of memorabilia, earning themselves a place in the 'hall of design classics'.

Jersey design has continuously developed over the years, team sponsorship alongside technological advances in materials have both played a part in the evolution - however some features remain unchanged.

Contrast Panel Cycling Shirt - Bradley Wiggins AW13 Collection

Typically the back hem is scooped, to help keep the rider's back covered whilst bent over in racing position. The back of the shirt also features a combination of fastened and open pockets - it would be no good having them on the front of the body as the contents would fall out mid-ride. A long zip fastening to the front can be opened to allow for ventilation.  

The cuts are traditionally slim and long, helping to reduce air resistance and allowing the fabric to 'perform'; wicking the moisture it needs to sit close to the skin. Sponsors will use a combination of print, embroidery or applique to showcase their names - colours, panels and tipping combinations become synonymous with specific teams.

Contrast Sleeve Cycling Shirt - Bradley Wiggins AW13 Collection 
During the late 1950s, jerseys worn by road riding style icons such as Tom Simpson and Jacques Anquetil made their way from performance wear to streetwear. Slim fitting and full of continental allure, the designs held huge appeal for the jazz loving modernists of that time. The fact that many of the shirts were crafted in merino wool was an added bonus – the breathable fabric was perfect for keeping fresh after a spot of all night dancing. Designs from this period have long continued to be a mainstay of the mod casual wardrobe.

This season's Bradley Wiggins Collection characteristically references jerseys from the Golden Age of cycling. Elements of vintage shirts are explored and blended with signature Fred Perry details, twin tipping colours lifted into colour block panels, a champion inspired stripe knitted into cuffs. Bradley has been involved in each and every stage of the design process, bringing his own ideas, inspirations and style and in turn, each shirt in the collection comes to to tell a story. 

See this season's Bradley Wiggins Collection online and in shops now.

Raf Simons / Fred Perry Autumn 2013 Collection

We're pleased to introduce the latest Raf Simons and Fred Perry collaboration collection, available online and in our Laurel Wreath Collection shops. Key pieces include a wool and leather varsity jacket in black and burgundy colour options, alongside a knitted Fred Perry Shirt and bold blue duffle coat.

Raf Simons Fred Perry Autumn 2013 2

Raf Simons Fred Perry Autumn 2013

Raf Simons Fred Perry Autumn 2013 3

The collection was shot by photographer Pierre Debusschere at the Hippodrome in Brussells. See the Autumn 2013 Raf Simons / Fred Perry Collection online now, or find your nearest Laurel Wreath Collection shop.

Behind the Scenes - The Walsh Factory

Introducing the Walsh Lostock Shoe to our ongoing Friends of Fred project.

Fred Perry took a visit to the Walsh Bolton workshop to meet the small team, Pete, Jon, Lynne, Michelle and Harry and to watch the Lostock manufacturing process from start to finish.

Walsh trainers are considered the original specialised running shoe. Founder, Norman Walsh began his training as a shoemaker in 1945, just three years later he was asked to make sprinting shoes for the 1948 Olympic Games in London. Following the creation of Walsh footwear brand in 1961, Norman collaborated with numerous athletes to create world leading performance styles.

Walsh Gb Multi

This season’s casual style Lostock shoe draws influence from Walsh’s performance roots. Crafted from durable nylon and suede, the classic three colour sports upper features a lightweight EVA sole unit and a Walsh label on the tongue and side wall.

Walsh Footwear Leather Tabs

At the very beginning of the process Pete creates paper patterns for the uppers, once he is happy with the design and sizes, he goes on to make a set of templates, known as knives. The knives, made from metal, do not look too dissimilar to a giant biscuit cutter. There can be 8 knives for every upper and every size requires its' own set. The knives fix to a special machine which presses them into sheets of material to create the individual parts.

Lynne stitches the pieces of nylon and suede together to create a flat shoe. A mould is then used and heat applied, to stiffen the heel (officially called 'closing'). At this point the shoe starts to take form.

 Walsh Footwear Closing

The upper is slipped around an anatomical mould of the foot known as a last. A lightweight insole is inserted; the shoe is then mechanically bound to the last and into its' final recognisable shape.

Walsh Footwear Lasts

Walsh Footwear Last

The final part of the process is known as 'soling'. The sole is glued to the upper and the complete shoe is fed onto a conveyor belt, which leads into a big oven. The shoe comes out, cools down and gets given the final treatment - a tag, laces, a tissue paper wrapping and a box.

Walsh Footwear Swingtickets

For this seasons' Friends of Fred, the handcrafted Lostock shoe is available in two colour options, Regal and Rosso (show below).

Walsh_Lostock  

See the full Friends of Fred selection online and in our Laurel Wreath Collection shops now.