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Check out all of the posts in the category ‘Interviews’ below. If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, try searching by using the box on the right hand side of this page.

Where Were You? by Garry O'Neill

Born and raised in Dublin, Garry O'Neill has always had an interest in his home city's local youth culture. Having collected Dublin street style photographs and memorabilia for several years, and noticing that there was little out there to document it; Garry set out to create a subcultural history of Dublin from the 1950s to the turn of the millennium. Teaming up with graphic designer and illustrator Niall McCormack, the pair spent over eighteen months collating hundreds of images to create Where Were You? Dublin Youth Culture & Street Style 1950 - 2000.

Where Were You? Cover Image

"The early seventies bootboy photos were probably the hardest to track down" remembers O'Neill. "I advertised around the city with posters and flyers for a couple of years. Most people were only too willing to help out as it was something that was going to, in some way, document their scene. It was difficult at first to track down good quality older material, like the fifties and sixties stuff, but it eventually turned up due to the length of time I spent looking for it."

 The Road House

Belvedere Boys Club - Mid 60s - photo contributed by Martin Coffey

Speaking of his own experiences with various street styles and groups, O'Neill says: "I liked and had lots of different clothes that are associated with one scene or another, but I’ve never wore them in any uniformed way. I loved punk, but I never felt like dressing up as a green hedgehog to convey that. You can be as anti-mainstream/establishment in a suit as you can in Doc Martens and studded leather jacket. Personally I liked the original suedehead scene from the early seventies, it was neat and stylish." The author's broad-minded approach is reflected in the book's content, which features images of groups ranging from mods, skins and teds to goths, new romantics, hippies and ravers.

60s Girls

Bray - Mid 60s - photo contributed by Brona Long

As O'Neill acknowledges in Where Were You? music and street tribes are indelibly linked. "Music was a huge influence, if you were into a certain kind of music; chances are you’d dress in a similar way to the groups or singers. The majority of the youth culture groups that we know, started on the back of some kind of music movement."

Parka Mods 1

O'Connell Street - Mid 80s - photo contributed by Dublin Opinion.

Noting the significance of the Fred Perry Shirt, O'Neill says: "it appears in the book in various photos - what started life as a sport shirt, has become a readily identifiable item of youth culture clothing around the globe, from the original mods and skinheads of the sixties to the football casuals of the 80s, the Britpop kids of the 90s and everything in-between. It’s an iconic piece of clothing in the same way as the steel-toe boot or the parka jacket."

Of the hundreds of personal images captured in the book, is there one that stands out for O'Neill?

"If I had to pick one, it would probably be the photo of the two lads on page 114. It’s from 1974 and they’re wearing crombie coats, pinstriped parallel trousers, polished George Webb type shoes, bowler hats and umbrellas; they almost look like two city gents. The look is certainly influenced by the Clockwork Orange film, more than any music movement."

Find out more about Where Were You? on the book's official website or Facebook page.

Images used with kind permission of Garry O'Neill. Published by HiTone Books, November 2011. Foreward by Steve Averill.

A Chat with Hannah Rochell

We caught up with Hannah Rochell; fashion writer and stylist at The Times and founder of enbrogue.com to talk about her life-long affection for Fred Perry, and what's on her gift list this year.

I've worked at The Times newspaper for the last five years, before which I was fashion editor of Who's Jack magazine. I recently founded enbrogue.com, which is a blog entirely dedicated to stylish flat shoes (I never wear heels!). I'm a music freak - listening to anything from Blur to ska to blues - and I play bass and have just started learning drums. I grew up on the Isle of Wight which is where my love for the mod scene and the smell of two stroke began; it hosts one of the largest scooter rallies in Europe every August bank holiday and aged 13, I longed to hang out with these impossibly cool people. I don't think I've spent August bank holiday anywhere else since about 1996!

When I was seventeen in 1994 my friend Jo and I hunted high and low for a Fred Perry in our size. We tried all the best second hand stores in London but everything was too big; we even tried Harrods children's section, although Jo had to go in on her own because I was refused entry (I was dressed in turned up ripped  skinny jeans and cherry DMs). Finally, my boyfriend at the time unearthed a child's Fred Perry in a local sports shop which he bought me for my birthday. He was so excited that he told Jo he was going to give it to me, and she promptly went and bought two for herself, ruining the surprise. I let her off though, I understood her excitement!

Fred Perry reminds me of all my favourite things: Blur, Quadrophenia, Britpop, the Isle of Wight and fashion. I love that it suits everyone from me to my husband to my dad, and that it's associated with all the best fashion tribes since the fifties and sixties.

Men S Lw Edit

I'm going to give this soft touch herringbone shirt to my dad. He's pretty cool for a guy that's pushing seventy - a guitarist and still gigging three times a week - so he's always in need of a good shirt to play in. I love the two-tone design, and that it's asymmetric.

This micro dot scarf has my brother's name written all over it. He usually avoids labels like the plague, but Fred Perry is the one brand he likes to spend money on. And everyone loves to receive a scarf at Christmas!

A couple of years ago I was brave and bought my husband some shoes for Christmas. They were a success, so I'm going to get him some more. This classic brogue has been given a twist with the checked insert and coloured laces. If they came in a size 4 I'd have bought them for myself!

Autumn/Winter 2012 Soft Touch Herringbone Shirt  and pure merino wool Micro Dot Scarf available now online & in Laurel Wreath Collection shops. Spring/Summer 2013 Ray Leather & Micro Check Brogues available now in Laurel Wreath Collection shops, and coming soon online.

Womens Auth Edit

My friend Maria loves Fred Perry. For her son's first birthday I bought the smallest Fred Perry shirt I could find. So I'll be giving her this flecked lambswool jumper for Christmas (it has elbow patches!). As a busy mum, she deserves a treat.

I don't know about you, but when I go out Christmas shopping I think it's only fair to buy something for myself. This Amy Molyneaux take on the classic Fred Perry shirt will be brilliant teamed with a printed skirt for New Year's Eve, and I'm also supporting a great charity to boot (the Amy Winehouse Foundation).

My 11 year-old niece is suddenly the same shoe size as me. She often rummages around in my shoe cupboard, asking when I will be having a clear-out, so I reckon it's time to treat her to a pair of her own. These George Cox creepers are perfect for teenagers, but I may well be borrowing them back for the odd wear now and again.

Autumn/Winter 2012  Flecked Lambswool Jumper and Spring 2013 Amy Winehouse Foundation Collection Lace Trim Shirt available now, both online and in our Authentic Shops. George Cox Gibson Creepers available now online and in our Laurel Wreath Collection shops, as part of our ongoing Friends of Fred project.

A Chat with The Scootographer

Seventeen year old Dominic is a student and talented photographer, with a specialty in taking unique shots of scooters and scooterists at events and rallies. Having already grown a keen following, we chatted to Dom about being a young Mod on the scene, his favourite shots and life as 'The Scootographer'.

The Scootographer 2

I don’t think there is any single explanation of how I got into the mod and scooter scene. I just love the music, clothes, scooters and style. I’m usually one of the youngest at events, although Brighton seemed to have a few people around my age, which was good to see.

The cost of buying and insuring a scooter means I don’t actually own one yet, as it would be too expensive for me at the moment, particularly as I am focusing on my photography business and college studies. I suppose the ideal thing would be for someone to donate me a scooter in return for some photography work!

The Scootographer 1

I do also believe that if the previous generation mods really want to keep the scene alive they should consider selling scooters to my generation without making too much profit, that might sound naive to some people but it's a serious point.

Although it’s very hard to choose a favourite scooter image (as I have taken so many) It was amazing to get a photograph of a manta ray swimming beneath me in the red sea earlier this year. If I had to choose one particular moment it was the photo shoot I did for Graham Webb and his 'Quadrophenia' Lambretta in Brighton (below).

The Scootographer Bw

People might find it hard to believe, but I don’t have a favourite photographer and I don’t think anyone in particular has influenced my style. I sometimes have a look on Flickr as there are a lot of talented photographers on there so I get some ideas and pick things up from Flickr.

I like to listen to music whilst I edit. It’s hard to choose my favourite tracks but my favourite bands include The Specials, The Stone Roses, The Jam, Oasis, The Maytals and The Kinks. I also like a bit of Mod reggae and Motown.

I couldn’t live without my Fred Perry coat. It’s a green parka/cagoule style coat and I wear it almost every day for college as it’s smart but casual and it’s also waterproof unlike any of my other jackets.

I have recently been working on some product photography for Supernova scarves, an online company who sell hand made scarves and pocket hankies. I will be in London at some point in November for a planned photo shoot on Carnaby Street. We are going to recreate a modern version of a famous photograph/scene from the film Quadrophenia.

My plan for 2013 is to travel with my camera throughout the UK and to certain parts of Europe. I would really like to visit Italy as It’s a place I have always wanted to go to.

You can see more of Dom's work on his website, Facebook and Twitter pages.