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Posts tagged as 'Mods'

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In Focus - The George Cox Monkey Boot

Maroon Boot Cut Out 

The George Cox Monkey Boot - click here to view

This week, we're pleased to introduce the George Cox Monkey Boot as part of our ongoing Friends of Fred project. Handmade at the company's Northamptonshire factory, these 14-hole lace ups have been crafted in high shine leather that develops its own individual character over time, improving with age.

Monkey Boot Mens 1

Originally designed as a standard issue army boot, the Monkey Boot has been adopted by various subcultures throughout the decades, originally picked up by the late 60s mods before becoming a firm favourite with both men and women on the skinhead scene.

Monkey Boot Group 2

The boot's unique shape hugs the ankle and tapers to the toe, making it ideal teamed with straight leg denim and a classic gingham shirt or Harrington jacket. The George Cox style features a leather lining, dual branding on the inner sock and an additional pair of yellow laces to add a pop of colour if preferred. Available in maroon or black colour options, in UK sizes 6-11.

Shop the latest Friends of Fred Collection online here, or find your nearest Laurel Wreath Collection shop.

Where Were You? by Garry O'Neill

Born and raised in Dublin, Garry O'Neill has always had an interest in his home city's local youth culture. Having collected Dublin street style photographs and memorabilia for several years, and noticing that there was little out there to document it; Garry set out to create a subcultural history of Dublin from the 1950s to the turn of the millennium. Teaming up with graphic designer and illustrator Niall McCormack, the pair spent over eighteen months collating hundreds of images to create Where Were You? Dublin Youth Culture & Street Style 1950 - 2000.

Where Were You? Cover Image

"The early seventies bootboy photos were probably the hardest to track down" remembers O'Neill. "I advertised around the city with posters and flyers for a couple of years. Most people were only too willing to help out as it was something that was going to, in some way, document their scene. It was difficult at first to track down good quality older material, like the fifties and sixties stuff, but it eventually turned up due to the length of time I spent looking for it."

 The Road House

Belvedere Boys Club - Mid 60s - photo contributed by Martin Coffey

Speaking of his own experiences with various street styles and groups, O'Neill says: "I liked and had lots of different clothes that are associated with one scene or another, but I’ve never wore them in any uniformed way. I loved punk, but I never felt like dressing up as a green hedgehog to convey that. You can be as anti-mainstream/establishment in a suit as you can in Doc Martens and studded leather jacket. Personally I liked the original suedehead scene from the early seventies, it was neat and stylish." The author's broad-minded approach is reflected in the book's content, which features images of groups ranging from mods, skins and teds to goths, new romantics, hippies and ravers.

60s Girls

Bray - Mid 60s - photo contributed by Brona Long

As O'Neill acknowledges in Where Were You? music and street tribes are indelibly linked. "Music was a huge influence, if you were into a certain kind of music; chances are you’d dress in a similar way to the groups or singers. The majority of the youth culture groups that we know, started on the back of some kind of music movement."

Parka Mods 1

O'Connell Street - Mid 80s - photo contributed by Dublin Opinion.

Noting the significance of the Fred Perry Shirt, O'Neill says: "it appears in the book in various photos - what started life as a sport shirt, has become a readily identifiable item of youth culture clothing around the globe, from the original mods and skinheads of the sixties to the football casuals of the 80s, the Britpop kids of the 90s and everything in-between. It’s an iconic piece of clothing in the same way as the steel-toe boot or the parka jacket."

Of the hundreds of personal images captured in the book, is there one that stands out for O'Neill?

"If I had to pick one, it would probably be the photo of the two lads on page 114. It’s from 1974 and they’re wearing crombie coats, pinstriped parallel trousers, polished George Webb type shoes, bowler hats and umbrellas; they almost look like two city gents. The look is certainly influenced by the Clockwork Orange film, more than any music movement."

Find out more about Where Were You? on the book's official website or Facebook page.

Images used with kind permission of Garry O'Neill. Published by HiTone Books, November 2011. Foreward by Steve Averill.

The A to Z of Mod

Fred Perry will feature in the upcoming book The A-Z of Mod; due to be released in April. Written by Paolo Hewitt and Mark Baxter, this heavily illustrated book covers every element of Mod culture from À Bout de souffle to Zoot Money. Combining a style-savvy commentary with cultural anthropology, this guide to the many aspects of Mods takes an alphabetical approach to the most enduring of youth cults; with Fred Perry capturing the letter 'F'.

A Z Of Mod

Paolo Hewitt began writing for Melody Maker and New Musical Express, before acting as the official biographer for groups Oasis and The Jam. Both a music and fashion enthusiast, Hewitt also owns a Mod-inspired knitwear label in Italy and has written the boom Fab Gear: The Beatles and Fashion (Prestel). Co-author Mark Baxter has been fascinated with fashion his entire life, owning a vintage clothing boutique and writing (with Hewitt) The Fashion of Football and The Mumper.

The A-Z of Mod will be published by Prestel and released on 23rd April 2012. You can pre-order a copy of the book HERE.